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Your Gift to DyslexiaHelp Goes Twice as Far On Giving Blueday

In honor of Giving Blueday, a generous donor has offered to match any donations to DyslexiaHelp up to $20,000 in aggregate. All gifts made or pledged on Tuesday, November 29, 2016, from 12:00 a.m. through 11:59 p.m. EST will be eligible for the match. Whether you are giving your first gift to DyslexiaHelp or your most significant one yet, double down on DyslexiaHelp with your gift on Giving Blueday!

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Your gift makes a difference. That's because DyslexiaHelp is completely supported by donors, just like you! You can even increase the size of your gift with funding from matching gifts and challenges that you can participate in throughout the day. No matter where you are, or the time of day, you can support what you love about DyslexiaHelp.

DyslexiaHelp is needed more now than ever. It is estimated that between 5 percent and 10 percent of the population is dyslexic and, as you may know, academic services are diminishing. As a result of not being properly identified, some of these very bright students often think of themselves as “stupid.” Below is just one example:

“I’m looking for help to answer questions regarding my ability to read and comprehend what I’m reading. I left school when I was 15 – I always thought I was just dumb or stupid. Now that I’m older I realize I had a learning disability. I’m probably dyslexic and I’m just looking for answers and maybe some proof. I’d like to go college, but I’m very worried that I’ll end up in the same situation I was in at high school. If there’s anything or any information that may be able to help me I would greatly appreciate it.” – Mathew R.

Through U-M’s DyslexiaHelp, Dr. Joanne Pierson (MS ’85, PhD ’99) personally responds to every email inquiry such as the one above. She ensures that the website connects users to current research findings, provides insights to design best-practice intervention methods, and helps individuals touched by dyslexia to gain new understanding into the disability.