In today’s technology-driven world, handwriting is becoming a part of the past. In a New York Times article published in 2014, many professionals are concerned about what we are losing as old-fashioned pen and paper is fading away. There is a common debate about whether or not handwriting actually matters; according to many professionals, it does. Their arguments lies in the educational development obtained by writing by hand rather than typing on a keyboard. In children, writing letters serves as a way to learn them, and without the actual act of writing out letters and words, the brain has a harder time retaining them. When a child writes, a part of their brain is activated and enables greater creativity and learning. Furthermore, some professionals believe writing to be a useful tool for those who have dyslexia and other learning disorders because of the cognitive stimulation. The benefits of handwriting extend further than childhood as well. As there has been a transition from note-taking by hand to note-taking by typing, researchers have looked into which is more effective. Their results have concluded that students learn better when they are writing on paper than typing on a computer due to the way the brain functions. Before we totally ditch handwriting in the classroom for a keyboard, we should think about what exactly is being lost.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave